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FDHA/FDFA Report on the State of Work on looted Art during the National Socialist era, in particular, on the subject of provenance research 17 January 2011

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On 17 January 2011 the Swiss Federal Office of Culture published a 33 page report on looted art in Switzerland dated 24 November 2010. The report is available here

The Federal Authorities published the following statement about the findings of the report on the Federal Administration's website:

Report on the state of work on looted art during the National Socialist era

Bern, 17.01.2011 - The Federal Office of Culture (FOC) is publishing on behalf of the Federal Council the "FDHA/FDFA Report on the State of Work on looted Art during the National Socialist era, in particular, on the subject of provenance research". The document, published on the Internet includes the summary of a survey of Swiss museums on the state of provenance research as well as the results of the "Holocaust Era Assets Conference" in Prague.

The work has an international context, especially as Switzerland participated at the end of June 2009 in the international "Holocaust Era Assets Conference" in Prague and adopted the "Terezin Declaration" together with 46 other nations.

The report is based on a voluntary survey of 551 Swiss museums on the state of provenance research. The Federal Office of Culture of the Federal Department of Home Affairs (FDHA) and the Directorate of Political Affairs of the Federal Department of Foreign Affairs (FDFA) conducted the survey from July 2008 to October 2010 on behalf of the Federal Council and in cooperation with the Swiss Conference of Cantonal Ministers of Education, the Association of Museums in Switzerland and the Swiss Art Museums Association. The survey resulted in a summary providing a general overview of the current situation.

The report finds that the application of the international declarations in the area of looted art is of considerable importance. Informational and awareness raising measures at all levels, in public and private museums, must be improved. Furthermore the report states that museums need to intensify provenance research. Finally the access to the results of provenance research as well as to relevant archives has to be simplified.

The document also includes the results of the conference in Prague in June 2009. In the run-up to the conference, an interim report presented by the "Conference on Jewish Material Claims against Germany" ("Claims Conference") from June 2009 pointed out that Switzerland was among those countries that had made substantial progress over the past ten years in the area of looted art during the National Socialist era.

The work must, however, continue in order to ensure the attainment over the long term of just and fair solutions in the area of looted art during the National Socialist era, based on the groundbreaking "Washington Conference Principles" of 1998 and the "Terezin Declaration" of 2009.

The Federal Council mandated the FDHA and the FDFA to continue their efforts in support of dealing with the problem of looted art in a transparent, legal and adequate manner and to release the report for publication.

Address for enquiries:

Jean-Frédéric Jauslin, Director of the Federal Office of Culture
Tel. +41 (0)31 322 92 61
jean-frederic.jauslin@bak.admin.ch

Benno Widmer, Head of the Specialized Body for the International Transfer of Cultural Property and Contact Bureau on Looted Art, Federal Office of Culture
Tel. +41 (0)31 322 03 25
benno.widmer@bak.admin.ch

Publisher:

Federal Department of Home Affairs
Internet: http://www.edi.admin.ch

The Report is presented on the Office of Culture's website with the following introduction:

Looted Art:

Public interest in looted and confiscated art from the World War II era has increased greatly at the international level. Private parties and researchers worldwide are investigating the inventories of archives and museums in search of cultural objects which disappeared during World War II and remain missing today. Meanwhile public and private museums in Europe and the USA have also begun checking their own inventories. In several countries task forces and commissions have been appointed at the federal level to reappraise archives, check questions of provenance, or accept and investigate claims of former owners and their heirs. A few private organizations and interest associations have dedicated themselves to these tasks too.

Procedures, rules, and agreements have hardly been worked out to date in the field where this variety of activities is occurring. Sealed or difficult-to-access archives, varying research methods and standards, as well as differing levels of understanding among the centers responsible greatly complicate scientific reappraisal. Also lacking at present is broad-based information networking among experts working for the study commissions, the interested organizations, and individual researchers. Finally legal bases and procedures differ from country to country, making it difficult for claimants to identify and pursue potential routes for resolution. Above all, private parties without specific expertise or support from an organization often face difficult hurdles here. In recognition of this problem the Swiss Federal Council decided to set up a Contact Bureau on Looted Art which falls under the Federal Office of Culture. The Swiss Confederation bases its activities in the area of looted art on the three pillars of transparency, legality and adequacy.

At the international level, Switzerland added its signature, along with 43 other states, to the "Washington Conference Principles on Nazi-Confiscated Art" at the international Conference on Holocaust-Era Assets in December 1998, thereby declaring that it attached great importance to the issue of looted art. Furthermore Switzerland participated at the end of June 2009 in the international "Holocaust Era Assets Conference" in Prague and adopted the "Terezin Declaration" together with 46 other nations (cf. Further information).

Contact Bureau on Looted Art
The Contact Bureau on Looted Art is a center of expertise at the federal level to respond to all issues linked to looted art from the World War II era. Its scope of activity includes the three following task areas:

Contacts
Federal Office for Culture
Contact Bureau on Looted Art
Benno Widmer
Hallwylstrasse 15
3003 Bern
T +41 (0)31 322 03 25
F +41 (0)31 324 85 87
E E-Mail

Further information

FDHA/FDFA report on the state of work on Nazi-looted art, in particular, on the subject of provenance research as above.

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